Author Topic: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience  (Read 32461 times)

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Offline Grond

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A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« on: May 13, 2015, 04:41:41 pm »
I have heard the recruiting process described as "a person who buys a car one time in their life, dealing with people who have sold cars for 15 years."

I am going to relate the experiences of a young man who played football, and was able to make the team at tryouts (walk-on) at a D2 college. This may be less of a thread, and more of a report. I am doing this because it seems there is so much information that would be helpful, that is hard to find.

A lot of people already know the info that I am going to list, so please feel free to correct me if you see any errors.

To begin, let's look at the different college classifications, and their scholarships (football):

Division I FBS - 85 scholarships, these are the U of Ark. and Arkansas State. DI FBS colleges CANNOT 'split' scholarships.

Division I FCS - 65 scholarships (I think). UCA and UAPB. Scholarships CAN be broken up. [Updated 11/1/15]

Division II - 36 scholarships, but they can be broken up , as the coaches see fit. There are six D2 colleges in Arkansas.

NAIA - 24 scholarships, and can be broken up. I think only NAIA college with football is Lyons. Tend to be small, private schools.

Division III - NO scholarships, but often help with financial aid. Also tend to be small, private schools.

NOTE: "broken up" means that partial athletic scholarships can be given out. A player could get a half academic and a half athletic scholarship, or perhaps an athletic scholarship that pays $1,000 per semester, with player needing to get student loans for the rest.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2015, 12:09:27 pm by Grond »

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2015, 04:53:39 pm »
One of the hardest things to find out was the height/weight/speed/strength of a college football athlete. The best place I have found is the info listed at GoBigRecruiting.com, in their "Recruiting 101" info.

I have not used GoBigRecruiting, and I don't know anything about them. But in my experience, the information they provide on player characteristics is fairly accurate. For example, a D2 offensive lineman runs a 5.4 to 5.5 forty, while a high end D1 o-lineman runs a 5.1/5.2 (most of the time).

Also be aware that this perspective comes from a losing high school football program, with coaches that have no connections.

Frankly, one of the best pieces of advice we heard was "Don't expect your high school coach to get you a sports scholarship."

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2015, 05:15:41 pm »
I STRONGLY SUGGEST YOU ATTEND SUMMER FOOTBALL CAMPS PUT ON BY COLLEGES. Most colleges put on some type of 'camp', that may be a half day without pads and cost $40, or three days WITH pads and cost $300.

We attended camps before our Junior year in high school, at D1 and D2 schools.  From that experience, we learned that the player was NOT a D1 prospect. Consequently, we attended several D2 camps BEFORE his Senior year.

NOTE: There were 50 to 150 players at each of the D2 camps, and each camp did a Forty, a Pro Shuttle, and a Bench Press. Went to a D1 camp at Arkansas State, that was a 1-day camp: had 500 players there!

The camps give you an impression of the college and the coaches. It gives you a chance to get noticed; and it gives you a hard lesson if you are not noticed.

We got noticed at three of the four camps we attended, even getting coach's phone numbers. Which sadly lead to a false sense of security.... :(
« Last Edit: October 23, 2018, 11:50:52 pm by Grond »

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2015, 12:17:23 pm »
To find out about whether a school is having a college camp, I suggest Google. For example, google "SAU football camp" to find out about times, costs, and requirements (including medical forms) for football camps put on by Southern Arkansas University.

Some kids are specifically invited to camps, and don't have to pay.

For a 1-day camp, there are generally three parts:
  1) Measurements: height/weight/forty/bench/pro shuttle, and usually a long jump or vertical jump.
  2) Position: Working with a position coach for technique training/evaluation.
  3) Competition: Involving passing skills. OL vs DL and QB/WR/RB/TE vs LB/DB.

NOTE - We had very GOOD experiences at all the camps, whether we were 'noticed' or not. The coaches were interested in the players, and watched out for player safety. You don't have to be a college athlete to enjoy these camps. You just have to like football.

WARNING - Since anyone can attend a camp, you are not necessarily facing college prospect competition. If you do well, that does NOT mean you are good enough to get a scholarship.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2016, 11:24:30 am by Grond »

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2015, 12:37:18 pm »
HIGHLIGHT FILM!!!!!

As soon a you get playing time, you need to make a highlight film. Most schools use Hudl for game film, and you can make your film from that.

For $10, you can download your film from Hudl, then post it on YouTube. And/or, you can email your film to a coach, or give the coach a jump drive. The film needs to have a minimum of 15 plays, but not more than 30.

NOTE: Most coaches get a zillion emails. And their school email is listed at the college website. If you do email info, it needs to be short and to the point. Are you a fast receiver? The subject of your email should read: "2016 WR, 4.6 forty".

Again, this is a good thing about camps: face to face contact with a coach.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2015, 12:27:11 pm »
We were told that the Recruiting Process works something like this:

A) If a college likes you, they invite you to a Recruiting Game. This is where you go to a home game, get a tour of campus/facilities, maybe on the sidelines.

B) If a college is serious about signing you, then you are invited to an Official Visit, typically in January.

C) You are then offered a "Letter of Intent", which is an offer for a scholarship. For football, national signing day is early February.

D1 colleges have more athletes to choose from, so an offer to attend a Recruiting Game is a big deal.

For D2 colleges, the methods vary widely. Some schools are very particular, while others will invite EVERYONE that attended a camp.

We went to three Recruiting Games at three different colleges. EACH COLLEGE TOLD US THEY WOULD "HAVE US BACK IN JANUARY".

And no one did. In November, we were on top of the world. But February was brutally cold, when no one has called......

The only positive news was one college that sent us tryout info in early February.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2015, 12:32:55 pm by Grond »

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2015, 04:50:54 pm »
Be aware that this player was NOT All-State. The number of All-State "nominees" depends on where you finish in the conference. This high school team was only allowed one nominee, and the player did not get it.

D1 schools have their tryouts in January or February. (I think. Don't know as much about D1.)

D2 colleges have tryouts in March or April [some as early as February (8/18/17)]. The tryout dates are listed at their websites. They are pretty much like the summer camps. After trying out, you get the "don't call us; we will call you." If you are picked, you hear something within a week after the camp.

I would say 1/3 to 1/4 of the players that tryout are successful 'walk-ons'. There were 40 to 60 young men at the tryouts.

UPDATE: The last sentence about "successful walk-ons" was probably wrong. Instead of 25% to 33% of the walk-on players making the teams, that number is probably closer to 10% to 15%.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2017, 01:05:23 pm by Grond »

Offline Valleysports

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2015, 08:21:01 pm »
Awesome read Grond - appreciate you taking the time to share the experience.  Hope he ends up All GAC.

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2015, 08:39:38 pm »
That's pretty accurate Grond.  Good job. 

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2015, 10:15:41 pm »
Thanks. What was really surprising was how the smallest differences in performance had a dramatic effect.

We know another player, of similar size and from a winning program. AND his forty was a tenth faster. He got at least two full ride offers to D2 schools.

For the player described here, even though his high school coaches didn't really have connections, they were immensely helpful with anything we requested.

This young man wants to be a high school football coach. He is playing football at the college he wanted to go to. It was a stressful experience, but he was able to achieve his goal.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2015, 09:12:29 pm by Grond »

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2015, 10:37:24 pm »
Full ride at a DII, that's a little unusual since they only get the 36 scholarships.  Was the total offer a combination of academic and athletic?  That's one common way for DII schools to get a kid a "full ride" .  Any way it comes to you, show me the money. 

Offline Valleysports

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2015, 11:10:59 pm »
It's stressful at any level.  I remember the stress of trying to get Zach Hocker a scholarship - kid set all kinds of HS Field Goal Records.  Hogs just wouldn't offer.  He finally signed LOI with ASU, but then Hawaii offered him.  When Hogs found out he was on an official visit to Hawaii - they suddenly decided they could let him compete for a punting position.  He signed with New Orleans, as a FG Kicker, last week!

Offline minerjack

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2015, 08:46:12 am »
A full paid athletic scholarship at a DII school is very rare.  I only saw one during my time at UAM.  If schools do give full ride scholarships, they better be breaking many school records and some NCAA records.  Otherwise that scholarship could mean going 6-5 versus 10-1, 9-2.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2015, 12:23:54 pm »
Full ride at a DII, that's a little unusual since they only get the 36 scholarships.  Was the total offer a combination of academic and athletic?  That's one common way for DII schools to get a kid a "full ride" .  Any way it comes to you, show me the money. 

I am not sure about the details of the "full ride", but I think you are correct. (I saw a pic of the offer, not the original.) I think the scholarship was likely a combination of the academic and athletic scholarships. (The kid had an ACT of around 25.)

A big thing in D2 schools is the "$5 Athletic Scholarship". This gives the kid the Signing Day experience, and they are on the roster; but not a lot of money.

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2015, 11:13:56 pm »
When you have a limited amount of money you have to find ways to maximize your scholarship signings.  Academic scholarships to smart athletes is the way, that frees up the athletic scholarship for the dummies. LOL.

Offline minerjack

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2015, 08:11:08 am »
Athletic Scholarships are basically pointless to athletes who get major academic scholarships anyways.  If a kid is on full academic, any money that is given athletically will not be refunded as cash later in the semester or given extra to the student.

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2015, 08:14:00 pm »
Of course that's correct but my point is that D II's have only 36 scholarships and are looking to maximize their scholarship athletes.  To do this they look for scholar athletes.  In such a case they can give more to a scholar than the scholar would otherwise receive. Many academic scholarships are well less than a full ride. example:  regular athletic scholarship at D II is rarely full ride, even rare to be 1/2 in many cases.  So a scholar athlete, who may not get a full ride on academics, gets money from academics and then some more money from the athletic department.  Combined they get more than they might have gotten from only one of the two sources.  The plus for the team is more athletes, the plus for the student athlete is more total money paid toward their college education cost.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2015, 11:31:06 pm »
You guys bring up some good points. It is my understanding that most D2 colleges give half athletic scholarships (roughly). But they are carrying rosters of over 100 players. (Henderson State had 167 in 2014.  :o)

My comments about a "full ride" were misleading. Sorry about that.  :-\

A few more comments about the recruiting experience:

I CAN'T EMPHASIZE ENOUGH ABOUT ALL THE UPS AND DOWNS WE HAD.

The "young man" I have spoke of in this thread is an offensive lineman: 6'-2" tall (6'-3" in shoes, 6'-4" in the high school listing). Ran a 5.6 forty, 325 lb bench and 400 lb squat. 5A school, 3-year starter. Weighed 250 lbs. [Update: He grew another inch in college! At the start of his red-shirt sophomore year, he is 6'-3", 285 lbs.]

Henderson State Summer Camp - Had the highest bench press: 225 lbs @ 16 reps. About 4th fastest forty for o-line at camp. Found this out when we got an email inviting him to a Recruiting Game. Attached to the email was a spreadsheet listing stats on ALL players attending the camp: 149 kids!

Some recruiting by student staff, but no signing offer (was discussed). Was asked to walk-on, but received no info.

UAM Summer Camp - Again, 225 lbs @ 16 reps on bench (about 60 kids attended?). Treated like rock star at camp, got coach's card/number, Recruiting Game,.......but no contact by late October, never heard from them again. Later learned o-line coach left, fell off UAM radar. Really liked coaching staff.

Attended UAM tryouts. Again, good experience, liked coaches, but SAU called first.

SAU Summer Camp [Overnight w/ pads] - Really a great experience. Email contact from coach, attended Recruiting Game. Received emails from coach. Received Tryout info on Feb. 5 (day after national signing day). Might describe player as a "recruited walk-on".

Attended SAU tryouts, and they called/emailed first.

Both SAU and UAM signed four o-linemen. Seemed they were looking for additional o-line at tryouts. Other D2 schools signed 6 or 7 o-linemen, and had no tryouts. (Starting a new thread on this.)

Harding University Summer Camp - Another good experience. (14 reps on the bench.) But no interest.

What is funny about Harding is that we originally thought Harding was The Perfect Fit. Player was as big as half the current o-linemen; winning record; nearby; offense fit what we ran in high school; recent athletes (not football) had attended....................and no interest. :-[

That is just how it goes. You have to give yourself options, because what YOU think is right may not be right for the coaching staff.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2017, 07:19:02 pm by Grond »

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2015, 10:31:12 pm »
Getting recruited or not getting recruited, getting signed or not getting signed is a tough year and a half or so.  It's no joy ride and the end product can be a great disappointment.  Seen lots of good high school players who didn't make it and nobody understood why.  College coaches are looking for different things, talent, coachability, ability to make plays, potential to grow as a player, and what ever else, who knows.  The fact is that only about 2-3% of high school players make it into college ball.

Offline Lions84

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2015, 02:00:41 pm »
Thanks this sounds about like it was back in the 1980's except the relationship between your HS Coach and the AIC Coach was very important.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2015, 08:22:50 pm »
At several of the summer camps, we saw (what appeared to be) high school coaches bringing in athletes. So, there are high school coaches that help out their players.

Offline ricepig

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2015, 12:29:15 pm »
At several of the summer camps, we saw (what appeared to be) high school coaches bringing in athletes. So, there are high school coaches that help out their players.

It happens a lot, especially with coaches that care for their players and wish to see them get their college paid for and career extended.

Offline Proud Buckaroo

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2015, 12:27:37 am »
Reading this makes me curious of what kid you're talking about.

Offline JC Guy

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2015, 01:06:22 am »
Ground I will have gone through this twice before the end of this year. Once with my kid and once with a kid that needed help. The first thing anybody needs to know about recruiters is they are snake oil salesmen. Everything you have posted will be very helpful to parents trying to find the way through this maze. The one thing I may add is if you do make a camp and catch the eye of the position coach before you get away get that position coach and the person responsible for recruiting your area together and exchange contact info and stay in touch. They also need to know you have an interest in them so they aren't wasting time. In this day and and time an athlete once he has made contact can and needs to use all forms of media to stay in front of the school he has interest in. Posting news paper articles and things of that nature. It comes down to what a team needs and they will have a few candidates for each position so as a player they go play lights out post it (some will not like it and think you are showing off) keep your Hudl film updated and stay in touch with the schools and hopefully your coach will make effort to help you. At the end of the day it's about trying to get you education payed for by playing the game you love.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #24 on: September 04, 2015, 04:50:07 pm »
Getting recruited or not getting recruited, getting signed or not getting signed is a tough year and a half or so.  It's no joy ride and the end product can be a great disappointment.  Seen lots of good high school players who didn't make it and nobody understood why.  College coaches are looking for different things, talent, coachability, ability to make plays, potential to grow as a player, and what ever else, who knows.  The fact is that only about 2-3% of high school players make it into college ball.

Absolutely correct.  :-\

Offline Paperman

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2015, 09:27:03 am »
Good job with this thread. GROND is doing potential college athletes a service.

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2015, 02:21:27 pm »
Good job with this thread. GROND is doing potential college athletes a service.
Very interesting thread.  Thanks for sharing.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #27 on: August 01, 2016, 09:46:30 pm »
An update: The young man that this thread was about is still playing D2 college football. He was red-shirted his freshman year, and has had a good experience.

We have learned some lessons, which I wanted to pass on.

TURNOVER...IN ROSTER
Nick Sabin, head coach of the University of Alabama, when asked why he was so intense about recruiting, answered: "Every year we have to replace 40% of our players."

I was stunned by this. Alabama is arguably the best program in D1 college football. But the pressure to succeed requires an enormous sacrifice in time and energy. In a 'perfect world', a college should lose 20% to 25% of the players to graduation.

NUMBERS: SPEED, STRENGTH, AND SIZE
Frankly, being All-State, or Defense Lineman of Your Team, or rushing for 1,000+ yards.......doesn't really matter. The numbers related to your athletic characteristics are what counts.

Because college football is BRUTAL. All the desire, effort, and courage in the world ....... is not going to beat an M1 tank. College coaches know this, and work hard to find players that can survive the environment.

But, if a young man is able to compete, it is an exhilarating experience.

LOCATION
For the D2/NAIA colleges, where you live is important. If you live in "nowhere", you must go to the camps!

Offline dragondad

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2016, 09:45:32 pm »
We're finding out a lot of truth to the M1 Tank analogy.  I have one that's made decent grades and ACT scores, he's one of the best at his position, one of the fastest in the state, and has consistently been the strongest in his weight class..... but so far his height and weight has been a turnoff for most coaches.  I have faith that we'll find a place for him regardless of scholarship offers that may or may not come.

Offline football nut

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #29 on: September 16, 2016, 10:21:37 pm »
We're finding out a lot of truth to the M1 Tank analogy.  I have one that's made decent grades and ACT scores, he's one of the best at his position, one of the fastest in the state, and has consistently been the strongest in his weight class..... but so far his height and weight has been a turnoff for most coaches.  I have faith that we'll find a place for him regardless of scholarship offers that may or may not come.
Tell him not to give up.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 09:44:27 pm by football nut »

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #30 on: October 02, 2016, 06:01:19 pm »
A few more thoughts.

THE IMPORTANCE OF PURSUING A GOAL
I believe it is important for a young man to try to attain a goal, even if he is unsuccessful. There is a certain satisfaction in "doing all you could".

Which is why it is important to have a Plan B for life (without football). And a Plan C.

STRESS....ON THE PLAYER AND THE FAMILY
Again, becoming a college athlete (or not becoming one) is a tough process. I hope it is easier for a player that signs. I watched an outstanding athlete go try out, and NOT make the team at another D2 college. I was stunned.

Even though the young man discussed in this thread DID make the team, I found myself having anger and stress issues months after our experiences.

COLLEGES CAN STILL SAY "NO", AFTER THEY HAVE SAID "YES"
One D2 college had contacted us in November and December, and even in early January. They kept saying, "We are going to have you up here."

Then we got The Call Before The Call. We were told (by a representative of the college) to "be home tomorrow night, be available", because this college was going to call us.

So we are all home, and we are all waiting..........and the college didn't call. They didn't call the next night, either. The young man finally called the college, and was told that they wanted him to walk-on. But they never sent us any walk-on information.

Later, we found out that this college had given a verbal commitment to another player, then changed their mind.

Hard Lesson: You don't have a 100% commitment from a college until you have a legally binding document.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 10:18:56 pm by Grond »

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #31 on: August 18, 2017, 02:06:04 pm »
Update: August, 2017 - Still playing football! Starting redshirt Sophomore year (academic Junior year)

PSYCHOLOGY (Attitude is Important)
All the factors that affect the typical college student also affect college athletes. Going from a small town to a big city, or going from the big city to a small town (which might be more stressful). You go from being the Smartest Kid in Class, to struggling just to pass the class in college.

College athletes have to deal with this stress. You were The Man for 3 years of high school football. And now, here you are at college, and you are Below Average. In fact, you may NEVER start. It can be too much for some young men to handle.

And too much for the parents, also. Was at a [college] game, and happened to be sitting behind some parents that could not understand why their freshman son was not in the game. They were debating whether or not to talk with the coach.  ::)

Life Lesson: It is important that you make an effort to understand the challenge of the task.

RUNNINGBACKS
Most of them have to be completely retrained in college.

In high school, they had such talent that they could run circles around, or over, the defense. Blocking didn't matter.

In college (with few exceptions), not following your blocking is suicide. If you hesitate, then you are simply allowing the defense to get to you faster. Hit the hole, and get the 3-yard gain, rather than dancing outside for the 2-yard loss.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 10:20:25 pm by Grond »

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #32 on: August 21, 2017, 11:54:48 am »
And too much for the parents, also. Was at a game, and happened to be sitting behind some parents that could not understand why their freshman son was not in the game. They were debating whether or not to talk with the coach.  ::)

LOL!!  Yep, that's not uncommon.  I have a friend who likes to say he's never heard a parent say his/her kid was not good enough to start and ought to be playing plenty. 

Offline gameoflife

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #33 on: August 21, 2017, 08:08:36 pm »
Grond, that's such an interesting take on recruitment.  All potential scholarship athletes should know how few high school players get to a college team.  Less than 2% make a DI roster, somewhere around 6-8% will get to a lower college division team.  Take that into account and you are looking at 2 0r 3 players on a typical team of 50 players, knowing that many small schools only have 25-35 players.  The odds are not good and getting on a college team is quite an accomplishment and getting scholarship money even a bigger accomplishment.  Also potential athletes should know, at the college level they really control you and your time. I've known a number of athletes who got to college and couldn't understand the demanding schedule and this resulted in their quiting.  As for coaches helping players get a scholarship, any coach should be able to make a phone call whether they have connections or not. 

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2017, 12:21:59 pm »
What is so difficult for young men is that, whether you get signed by a college or not, you must work your butt off to have the CHANCE to get noticed.

Other factors, such as where you live, and how good your high school team is, affect your ability to get noticed. That is not fair, but that is how it is.

WALK-ON'S AT THE RAZORBACKS
If you look at the Arkansas Razorback's roster at ESPN [8/24/17], it lists around 115 players. (There are three #18's.)

Arkansas can only have 85 football scholarships, so 30 of those guys don't have athletic scholarships!

What's more, I heard a D2 college football coach say that you really need a roster of about 130 players for a functional team (people for practice, scout team, etc.).

I didn't realize how important the "lowly walk-on" is in major college athletics.

Offline Lions84

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #35 on: May 21, 2018, 11:29:45 am »
Thanks and we need another update.

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #36 on: August 07, 2018, 10:17:29 pm »
Update August, 2018.

Entering redshirt Junior year. 2nd year starter on the o-line. High expectations, but every game is tough.

SAU keeps their word: large portion of college paid for (athletic & academic & Arkansas Lottery).

But nothing is given. You MUST work to be rewarded.

Offline Valleysports

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #37 on: August 08, 2018, 12:28:09 pm »
Great to hear this report!!!

Offline Grond

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #38 on: June 23, 2019, 02:28:34 pm »
Update, June 2019.

The young man that this thread about is entering his Redshirt Senior season; his 5th year of SAU football.

As a parent, I continue to be grateful for the experience and rewards that Southern Arkansas University has delivered to my son. But nothing is given; you must work, and you must continue to work. Even at this point, a starting position is not guaranteed; it must be earned.

Looking back on all this, the best advice for athletic characteristics is still Go Big Recruiting, in their Recruiting 101: Positional Guidelines area:

https://www.gobigrecruiting.com/recruiting101/football/positional_guidelines

Let's Ride! Go #74!

Offline Justlikegoodfootball

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #39 on: July 05, 2019, 07:12:42 pm »
Ill throw another thought into the fire. My son had 3 D2 offers. He had a 30 on the ACT and finished in the top 4 at the stage choir competition. He played ball in the 7A. When he was on his visits and sat down with the coach he asked 2 non football questions. What help was available for academics and would he be allowed to participate in the school choir. The answer was the same every time. Greatest academic help in the world and sure you can be in the choir but remember who is paying for your school. On a whim, he wanted to visit a D3 school. He liked what he heard and visited 2 more. In the end, his financial aid surpassed any of the D2 offers. He got aid for academics and choir. His football experience was great. For the first time since the 10th grade he was able to enjoy life outside of football. The academic help was impressive and the small school atmosphere allowed a lot of interaction with professors and administration.

Don't be fooled by the level of competition. While not any where near the level of D1 he did have a 4th string D1 QB and RB transfer in. Both contributed greatly to the teams success. I asked the RB why he transferred. He said that he had realized he wasn't going pro, wanted to play and wanted a diploma. He is a high school coach.

As for my son's experience. He had 1 concussion and broke his foot 1/2 way through his sophomore year. He just finished med school. Best of all,  the head coach and OC check in with him 3-4 times a year. Two of his professors communicate with him frequently. They care about the kids and it showed for the first day he was on campus.

As for those that think you have to be a genius to attend a D3, not true. All D3's have their standards but don't be afraid to apply. Get involved with the coaches and they will help you find money if it is out there.


Offline Mulerider4Life

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2020, 11:27:42 am »
Update, June 2019.

The young man that this thread about is entering his Redshirt Senior season; his 5th year of SAU football.

As a parent, I continue to be grateful for the experience and rewards that Southern Arkansas University has delivered to my son. But nothing is given; you must work, and you must continue to work. Even at this point, a starting position is not guaranteed; it must be earned.

Looking back on all this, the best advice for athletic characteristics is still Go Big Recruiting, in their Recruiting 101: Positional Guidelines area:

https://www.gobigrecruiting.com/recruiting101/football/positional_guidelines

Let's Ride! Go #74!

Was a great player at SAU! Hope he enjoyed his time!

Offline Valleysports

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Re: A D2 Football Walk-on Experience
« Reply #41 on: July 08, 2020, 11:04:07 pm »
Feel free to give a report once a year on whatever he's doing.  It's interesting!  The football goes by so fast.. My son skipped college ball, went med.  Couple of years into LSU Dental School..

 


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